Wednesday, January 10, 2007

30 lbs

Here is my documentation that I have for "30 lbs" so far, filmed at "Habits of Production" today. This piece consists of a microphone embedded in the floor, that runs to an amplifier cranked up to full volume, that runs to a speaker that is covered in 30 lbs of flour. The flour mutes the sound and absorbs it creating seismic events on the surface. Sorry for the youtube quality, you can see more at full resolution.

Enjoy!

1 comment:

Bjorn said...

I have an idea for a flour-based project. You could get large tubes, like four feet high, 3 inches in diameter. Put a speaker in the bottom of the tube, and use an equlizer to use only ultra low frequencies. You could then attach a microphone, and place it somewhere. This could be done in series, like an organ. If sophisticated enough, wireless mics could be used, and placed around the event, to pick up ambient noise. The effect, if I remember correctly, is the creation of frequency lines that appear horizontally, and change depending on the tone generated.

Another idea I thought up, but might be something already in existance, is a type of fountain. This could be as tall as four or five feet. The bottom of this fountain would be a glass bowl, like the kind used to put floating candles in. Under the bowl would be a sound sensitive LED array that could accept an input. A microphone would be placed on the outside of the bowl, and it's signal amplified, and passed to the LED array. The idea is that a single drop at a time would cause a drematic reaction from the array, and the lights would shine through the water. Perhaps the water could be made cloudy, to enhance the effect. The pump should be manual, to control sound, and could be pushed by someone nearby, or by stepping on the floor. The top of the fountain would be similar to a shower head in a way, except controled to dispense a single drop, or as small an amount as possible. The challenge would be to control the microphone so it only picks up the sound of the drop, and resulting waves, and disregards the ambient noise.